Marine Laboratory Services

LABORATORY SERVICES FOR THE MARINE INDUSTRY

Whether you run a fleet of commercial ships, superyachts or harbour tugboats, keeping your vessels safe and well maintained is a challenge. We are leaders in equipment condition monitoring for the global marine industry. Our high precision services ensure your fleet operates at peak performance with continuous fluid and debris analysis. Data generated is compared across similar equipment and oil grades to identify potential issues so you can take action before problems arise.
 

As specialists in our field, we understand the time, safety and maintenance pressures you face. Our comprehensive range of services, including oil, hydraulic fluid, fuel, debris and filter analysis, is tailored to your specific needs so you always have the resources you need when you most need them. With the highest laboratory standards, world-leading technical expertise and excellent customer service, we have created long-lasting partnerships with many of the world’s most respected marine operators and manufacturers.

 

TOTAL ANALYSIS PROGRAM

Elemental Analysis ICP Spectrometry

ICP

Determination of additive elements, wear metals and contaminants in used lubricating oils by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Atomic Emission Spectrometry. This test provides a rapid screening of used oil for wear indications.
Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometers (ICP) can measure 23 elements simultaneously down to 0.1 parts per million. High concentrations of particular elements can indicate excessive engine wear or the presence of contaminants. Since the wear rate of every engine is different, each engine is treated individually; and since metals have unique elemental concentrations, it is possible to predict the likelihood of bearing failure and component wear e.g thrust washers, metallic oil seals, oil pumps. Levels of those elements characteristic of oil additives are useful for confirmation of the oil grade in use, moreover, they may indicate contamination with fuel, oil, water, or incorrect oil type.

Elemental Analysis ICP Spectrometry

Viscosity

This test determines the kinematic viscosities of liquid petroleum products and hydraulic fluids at 40°C and 100°C. The apparatus consists of four calibrated tubes mounted in an oil bath maintained at a constant temperature.

The lubricating system keeps friction between surfaces to a minimum and assists in heat dissipation. Therefore the efficient operation of any equipment relies on use of the correct viscosity lubricant. Kinematic viscosities are determined at 40°C and/or 100°C. Significant deviation (+ or - 20%) from the viscosity of the fresh oil may indicate a build up of oxidation products due to overheating, contamination with fuel, hydraulic fluid, water, or top-up with oil of a different grade or degradation of the oil itself.

Viscosity

TAN Total Acid Number

This test measures the measurement of the acidic constituents in oils and is reported in milligrams of potassium hydroxide per gram of sample.

Oils degrade while in service, due to both acidic and basic oxidation. An increase in the acid number of a used oil is a measure of the amount of acidic substances absorbed. It is measured by determining the Total Acid Number (TAN) of the oil. The value is checked against published condemning limits. The rate of change of the TAN is more important than its absolute value. A rapid increase may be caused by excessive degradation due to oxidation, hotspots from skidding bearings, carbon seals, dirty oil ways or by top-up with a different oil.

TAN Total Acid Number

Water by Karl Fischer

This test is used to determine the water content in petroleum products by automatic coulometric Karl Fischer titration, using an oven.

Water contamination in hydraulic fluids or oils is a significant problem. Water produces both emulsions that increase the viscosity and decrease the load bearing ability of the oil and under load, water can heat and cause either cavitation or Hydrogen embrittlement. All are major causes of increased wear, rusting and sludge build-up, and, when combined with combustion gases in engine oils can form strong corrosive acids. Using coulometric Karl Fischer titration, oil water levels are measured down to parts per million concentrations. The acceptable limit is set by the engine manufacturer.

Water by Karl Fischer

Visual Appearance

This test is used to describe the visual appearance of petroleum products in terms of clarity, brightness and free water.

The appearance of a sample can be important in determining the condition of the equipment it was taken from e.g. an early warning about water contamination, or serious overheating, or presence of visible debris.

Visual Appearance

Fuel Dilution by Gas Chromatography

This test is used to determine fuel dilution as percentage by weight in lubricating oil.

Various standards of fuels (Diesel, Bio-Diesel and Gasoline) are prepared in various oil grades and injected onto a Gas Chromatography Column to create calibration curves. The unknown samples are injected and their readings are compared with the standards to calculate the fuel dilution.

Fuel Dilution by Gas Chromatography

Flash Point - Go / No-Go

This test is used to determine the closed cup flash point by the go/no go method using the Setaflash Tester in the temperature range of 30oC to 300oC.

Fuel contamination of lubricating oils is a potential hazard. Even a small dilution can radically reduce viscosity and flash point, with serious consequences. Measuring the flash point is a sensitive test to determine the presence of fuel. In piston engines it may be a sign of injection pump wear, blocked injectors or inefficient combustion, whereby unburnt fuel is deposited on the cylinder walls and mixes with the lubricating oil. In some jet engines the fuel is heated by the oil, any leak in the heat exchanger will force fuel into the oil with potentially damaging consequences. Initially the oils are flashed at a screening temperature dependant on application.

Flash Point - Go / No-Go

Sulphur and Chlorine

This test is designed to determine the Sulphur and Chlorine content in liquid petroleum products.

The distillation of crude oil to make mineral oils and fuels is ineffective at totally eliminating Sulphur. Excessive Sulphur can produce reactions with water to form strong acids which overtime degrade the lubricating oil. In addition, high chlorine levels in some fuels, especially landfill gas, add to the level of acids that end up in the oil, decreasing its effective life still further. Monitoring oil Sulphur and Chlorine concentration by x-ray fluorescence, condemns the oil at a suitable time. Limits are set by the engine and oil manufacturers.

Sulphur and Chlorine

Water test by Crackle

This test determines the presence of water in new or used oils. Confirmation of the amount of water may be determined by other methods.

Significant water contamination is undesirable, and it should be removed or lowered as soon as possible. Placing oil on a heated surface will quickly and easily determine the presence of trace levels of water in oil. Using a representative sample size and a stable temperature enables an educated estimate as to the amount of contamination.

Water test by Crackle

Density or Specific Gravity

The sample is injected into an oscillating tube, the change in its oscillation is directly proportional to the Density of the fluid.

Measurement of Relative Density or Specific Gravity can be used to confirm that the correct fluid is in use by comparison of the result against product specification. The determination can be carried out using a Digital Density Meter, and can also be used to calculate concentrations of one fluid in another(if the densities of both fluids are known).

Density or Specific Gravity

Neutralisation Number / Titration

This test is used to determine the acidic constituents by colour titration, in petroleum products that are soluble or nearly soluble in mixtures of toluene and isopropyl alcohol. It may also be used to determine basic constituents.

Oils normally are quoted with a neutralisation number or TAN/TBN range at manufacture and changes to this can indicate possible degradation while in service. An increase in the acid number of a used oil is a measure of the amount of acidic substances absorbed or created.  The value is checked against published condemning limits. The rate of change is more important than its absolute value. The results of this method do not have to agree with other measurements of Acidity or Alkalinity.

Neutralisation Number / Titration

RULER

This test measures the antioxidants in petroleum products for the determination of remaining useful life. The normal range is 0% - 100%.

Samples are mixed with a solvent suitable to oil type, and then compared against stored reference oils. The percentage of the antioxidant additives are calculated and depending on their level a calculation of remaining useful life (RULER) is measured.

RULER

Chloro Fluoro Hydrocarbons by Gas Chromatography

This test determines the concentrations of chloro-fluoro hydrocarbons in oils and hydraulic fluids. It is an indication of the contamination by compounds used for cleaning or degreasing component surfaces.

The Montreal Protocol banned the use of CFC's, but due to unavailability of a substitute that is quite as effective, they still continue to be used as degreasing agents. However, under certain circumstances they can breakdown and react with water to form an acidic medium that attacks metal surfaces. To prevent this, it is possible to monitor for their presence and change oil before any serious damage can occur.

Chloro Fluoro Hydrocarbons by Gas Chromatography

Debris Analysis

This test covers the analysis of wear contaminants from oil wetted surfaces in the oil lubrications systems of turboprop, turbofan or APU engines.This is accomplished by analysing the residue obtained from flushing the oil filter in accordance with the method.

The O.E.M. has developed a method to characterise debris from filters to create a protocol to diagnose the health of their equipment. Approximate proportions are allocated to the different materials observed, eg Magnetic, Steel, Aluminium, Copper, Carbon, etc. This is achieved using wet chemical analysis (which is a destructive test). We try to pinpoint areas of concern using the SEM which still leaves material to be analysed further if necessary.

Debris Analysis

NAS 1638 Particle Count

The sample is pumped through a sensor, which counts and sizes the particles. A 100ml of sample is counted and the particles are grouped into various size ranges. The results are assessed against NAS 1638 to give ratings which determine the cleanliness of the fluid.

Hydraulic systems are sensitive to the presence of solid particulate matter or 'dirt'. Dirt particles interact with moving surfaces that accelerate wear. If they are not removed or at least diluted, loss of operating efficiency and eventual breakdown is more likely. Sizing and counting of particulate contamination in hydraulic fluids are measured by a Particle Size Analyzer. Counts are recorded as particles per 100 ml in the ranges 5-15, 15-25, 25-50, 50-100, 100+ microns. Limits are set by the manufacturers.

NAS 1638 Particle Count

ISO 4406 Particle Count

The sample is pumped through a sensor, using a syringe attached to a Screw Thread Device (STD) which counts and sizes the particles. One ml of sample is counted repetitively until stable results are achieved. The results are assessed against NAS 1638 or ISO 4406 to give ratings which determine the cleanliness of the fluid.

Hydraulic systems are sensitive to the presence of solid particulate matter or 'dirt'. Dirt particles interact with moving surfaces that accelerate wear. If they are not removed or at least diluted, loss of operating efficiency and eventual breakdown is more likely. Sizing and counting of particulate contamination is measured by using a laser light obscuration method. Counts are recorded as particles per 1 ml in various size ranges depending on requirements (NAS or ISO codes). Limits are set by the manufacturers.

 

ISO 4406 Particle Count

SEM

Debris to be analysed is placed in the SEM and bombarded with electrons which release X rays characteristic of the element that they hit. These X-rays are used to determine the elemental composition of the alloy.

Our laboratory has always appreciated the analytical capabilities of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for the examination of metallic and non-metallic debris recovered from oil samples, oil filters, or chip detectors. A visual assessment of the size, shape and age (i.e. corrosion) of the debris forms the initial stage of analysis. Further investigations are conducted with the use of x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy to determine the composition of the debris. For metallic debris, the material classification can be achieved by comparing these elemental results with published specifications. This can help pinpoint the source the components responsible for the debris.

SEM

Micro-biological Test

Sterile membranes are used to filter the fluid and these are then placed on a suitable growth medium and allowed to incubate. After 5 days, they are assessed for growth.

Fuel samples are tested for the presence of viable fungal spores and aerobic bacteria. The presence of a high content of aerobic bacteria in an otherwise microorganism free sample often indicates that the environment may soon become favourable for further microbial activity. Slight water contamination favours the self-perpetuating environment of the fungus Hormoconis resinae. This fungus forms dense mycelial mats which break up and move through the fuel system causing numerous operational problems. In addition, these mats release organic acids and produce a highly oxygenated environment which can favour electrolytic attack of metals, even penetrating tank coatings, consume O-rings and rubber hosing. Spectro's method for the detection of viable microorganisms in hydrocarbon fuels follows the Institute of Petroleum Standard Method.

Micro-biological Test

Water by Karl Fischer

This test is used to determine the water content in petroleum products by automatic coulometric Karl Fischer titration, using an oven.

Water contamination in hydraulic fluids or oils is a significant problem. Water produces both emulsions that increase the viscosity and decrease the load bearing ability of the oil and under load, water can heat and cause either cavitation or Hydrogen embrittlement. All are major causes of increased wear, rusting and sludge build-up, and, when combined with combustion gases in engine oils can form strong corrosive acids. Using coulometric Karl Fischer titration, oil water levels are measured down to parts per million concentrations. The acceptable limit is set by the engine manufacturer.

Water by Karl Fischer

Density or Specific Gravity

The sample is injected into an oscillating tube, the change in its oscillation is directly proportional to the Density of the fluid.

Measurement of Relative Density or Specific Gravity can be used to confirm that the correct fluid is in use by comparison of the result against product specification. The determination can be carried out using a Digital Density Meter, and can also be used to calculate concentrations of one fluid in another(if the densities of both fluids are known).

Density or Specific Gravity

Visual Appearance

This test is used to describe the visual appearance of petroleum products in terms of clarity, brightness and free water.

The appearance of a sample can be important in determining the condition of the equipment it was taken from e.g. an early warning about water contamination, or serious overheating, or presence of visible debris.

Visual Appearance

Filter Debris

This is an in-house test for assessing filter debris, and determining its constituents.

This method describes how to remove debris from various filter types and the analysis using SEM to try to establish the source of any resulting alloys.

Filter Debris

Debris Analysis

This test covers the analysis of wear contaminants from oil wetted surfaces in the oil lubrications systems of turboprop, turbofan or APU engines.This is accomplished by analysing the residue obtained from flushing the oil filter in accordance with the method.

The O.E.M. has developed a method to characterise debris from filters to create a protocol to diagnose the health of their equipment. Approximate proportions are allocated to the different materials observed, eg Magnetic, Steel, Aluminium, Copper, Carbon, etc. This is achieved using wet chemical analysis (which is a destructive test). We try to pinpoint areas of concern using the SEM which still leaves material to be analysed further if necessary.

Debris Analysis

Elemental Analysis ICP Spectrometry

Determination of additive elements, wear metals and contaminants in used lubricating oils by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Atomic Emission Spectrometry. This test provides a rapid screening of used oil for wear indications.

Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometers (ICP) can measure 23 elements simultaneously down to 0.1 parts per million. High concentrations of particular elements can indicate excessive engine wear or the presence of contaminants. Since the wear rate of every engine is different, each engine is treated individually; and since metals have unique elemental concentrations, it is possible to predict the likelihood of bearing failure and component wear e.g thrust washers, metallic oil seals, oil pumps. Levels of those elements characteristic of oil additives are useful for confirmation of the oil grade in use, moreover, they may indicate contamination with fuel, oil, water, or incorrect oil type.

Elemental Analysis ICP Spectrometry

NAS 1638 Particle Count

The sample is pumped through a sensor, which counts and sizes the particles. A 100ml of sample is counted and the particles are grouped into various size ranges. The results are assessed against NAS 1638 to give ratings which determine the cleanliness of the fluid.

Hydraulic systems are sensitive to the presence of solid particulate matter or 'dirt'. Dirt particles interact with moving surfaces that accelerate wear. If they are not removed or at least diluted, loss of operating efficiency and eventual breakdown is more likely. Sizing and counting of particulate contamination in hydraulic fluids are measured by a Particle Size Analyzer. Counts are recorded as particles per 100 ml in the ranges 5-15, 15-25, 25-50, 50-100, 100+ microns. Limits are set by the manufacturers.

NAS 1638 Particle Count

ISO 4406 Particle Count

The sample is pumped through a sensor, using a syringe attached to a Screw Thread Device (STD) which counts and sizes the particles. One ml of sample is counted repetively until stable results are achieved. The results are assessed against NAS 1638 or ISO 4406 to give ratings which determine the cleanliness of the fluid.

Hydraulic systems are sensitive to the presence of solid particulate matter or 'dirt'. Dirt particles interact with moving surfaces that accelerate wear. If they are not removed or at least diluted, loss of operating efficiency and eventual breakdown is more likely. Sizing and counting of particulate contamination is measured by using a laser light obscuration method. Counts are recorded as particles per 1 ml in various size ranges depending on requirements (NAS or ISO codes). Limits are set by the manufacturers.

 

ISO 4406 Particle Count

Visual Appearance

This test is used to describe the visual appearance of petroleum products in terms of clarity, brightness and free water.

The appearance of a sample can be important in determining the condition of the equipment it was taken from e.g. an early warning about water contamination, or serious overheating, or presence of visible debris.

Visual Appearance

Conductivity

This test determines electrical conductivity of hydraulic or similar fluids using a null indicating potentiometer.

Conductivity measures the amount of electrical resistance of hydraulic fluid at a standard temperature. Any foreign compounds e.g water, dirt, grit, salts can upset the conductivity. The fluid manufacturer sets their own limits.

Conductivity

Density or Specific Gravity

The sample is injected into an oscillating tube, the change in its oscillation is directly proportional to the Density of the fluid.

Measurement of Relative Density or Specific Gravity can be used to confirm that the correct fluid is in use by comparison of the result against product specification. The determination can be carried out using a Digital Density Meter, and can also be used to calculate concentrations of one fluid in another(if the densities of both fluids are known).

Density or Specific Gravity

TAN Total Acid Number

This test measures the measurement of the acidic constituents in oils and is reported in milligrams of potassium hydroxide per gram of sample.

Oils degrade while in service, due to both acidic and basic oxidation. An increase in the acid number of a used oil is a measure of the amount of acidic substances absorbed. It is measured by determining the Total Acid Number (TAN) of the oil. The value is checked against published condemning limits. The rate of change of the TAN is more important than its absolute value. A rapid increase may be caused by excessive degradation due to oxidation, hotspots from skidding bearings, carbon seals, dirty oil ways or by top-up with a different oil.

TAN Total Acid Number

Viscosity

This test determines the kinematic viscosities of liquid petroleum products and hydraulic fluids at 40°C and 100°C. The apparatus consists of four calibrated tubes mounted in an oil bath maintained at a constant temperature.

The lubricating system keeps friction between surfaces to a minimum and assists in heat dissipation. Therefore the efficient operation of any equipment relies on use of the correct viscosity lubricant. Kinematic viscosities are determined at 40°C and/or 100°C. Significant deviation (+ or - 20%) from the viscosity of the fresh oil may indicate a build up of oxidation products due to overheating, contamination with fuel, hydraulic fluid, water, or top-up with oil of a different grade or degradation of the oil itself.

Viscosity

Water by Karl Fischer

This test is used to determine the water content in petroleum products by automatic coulometric Karl Fischer titration, using an oven.

Water contamination in hydraulic fluids or oils is a significant problem. Water produces both emulsions that increase the viscosity and decrease the load bearing ability of the oil and under load, water can heat and cause either cavitation or Hydrogen embrittlement. All are major causes of increased wear, rusting and sludge build-up, and, when combined with combustion gases in engine oils can form strong corrosive acids. Using coulometric Karl Fischer titration, oil water levels are measured down to parts per million concentrations. The acceptable limit is set by the engine manufacturer.

Water by Karl Fischer

Chloro Fluoro Hydrocarbons by Gas Chromatography

This test determines the concentrations of chloro-fluoro hydrocarbons in oils and hydraulic fluids. It is an indication of the contamination by compounds used for cleaning or degreasing component surfaces.

The Montreal Protocol banned the use of CFC's, but due to unavailability of a substitute that is quite as effective, they still continue to be used as degreasing agents. However, under certain circumstances they can breakdown and react with water to form an acidic medium that attacks metal surfaces. To prevent this, it is possible to monitor for their presence and change oil before any serious damage can occur.

Chloro Fluoro Hydrocarbons by Gas Chromatography

Neutralisation Number / Titration

This test is used to determine the acidic constituents by colour titration, in petroleum products that are soluble or nearly soluble in mixtures of toluene and isopropyl alcohol. It may also be used to determine basic constituents.

Oils normally are quoted with a neutralisation number or TAN/TBN range at manufacture and changes to this can indicate possible degradation while in service. An increase in the acid number of a used oil is a measure of the amount of acidic substances absorbed or created.  The value is checked against published condemning limits. The rate of change is more important than its absolute value. The results of this method do not have to agree with other measurements of Acidity or Alkalinity.

Neutralisation Number / Titration

Water test by Crackle

This test determines the presence of water in new or used oils. Confirmation of the amount of water may be determined by other methods.

Significant water contamination is undesirable, and it should be removed or lowered as soon as possible. Placing oil on a heated surface will quickly and easily determine the presence of trace levels of water in oil. Using a representative sample size and a stable temperature enables an educated estimate as to the amount of contamination.

Water test by Crackle

OIL ANALYSIS TESTS

TESTING KITS

We supply a range of kits to to help prepare and deliver oil, hydraulic fluid, fuel, debris and filter samples for analysis.

Available Kits

FAQs

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Manage, review and analyse your trend monitoring data 24/7/365

Find out more

If you would like further information about our services for the
Marine industry please contact the Spectro | Jet-Care team.

Find out how our services have helped companies across the world
save time and money through early detection of potential problems.

Visit the Resources section to download brochures,
user guides and other documents specific to your industry.

CUSTOMERS

Latest News

Jet-Care® announce another successful quality audit for their GPA trend monitoring service

Jet-Care® announce another successful quality audit for their GPA trend monitoring service

Jet-Care, the independent leader in engine trend monitoring services for the aviation industry, today announced that another successful quality audit was completed this week for their GPA (Gas Path Analysis) engine trend programs.

... Read more

Shows and Conferences

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5th - 6th July 2017

UK AD & Biogas & World Biogas Expo 2017

ACCREDITATIONS

  • The use of the UKAS accreditation mark does not imply that all activities are accredited by UKAS. Accreditation covers the laboratory activities in accordance with the Schedule of Accreditation, which can be found on the UKAS website.

CONNECT WITH US

SPECTRO | JET-CARE UK

Local time: 2:41PM
contact UK

Welcome to Spectro | Jet-Care

In 2015 we completed the move to Hatchwood Place, a Grade II listed complex, which marked the next milestone in our Company's growth.  With an extensive refurbishment of the facility we were able to more than treble the size of our previous laboratory space therefore allowing us to extend the analysis portfolio offered to our customers around the world.

 


Spectro | Jet-Care are proud to offer a first class responsive service to our customers:

  •   Highly experienced team of technicians and analysts
  •   Engine trending through the Jet-Care Gas Path Analysis Program
  •   UKAS accredited laboratory facilities
  •   Comprehensive reporting of analysis results

Spectro | Jet-Care team:

David Glass   Managing Director
Guy Glass   Financial Controller, Director
Alan Baker   International Sales and Marketing Manager
Richard Medhurst   Operations Manager
Jim Lawrie   Jet-Care GPA Operations Manager
Chris Brown   IT Manager
Stephanie Little   Aviation Business Development Manager 
Trevor Jackson   Marine Business Development Manager
Alison Hayden   Communications Officer
Alison Potere   Continuous Improvement Manager
Andres Grille   Chief Scientific Officer

Spectro | Jet-Care
Hatchwood Place,
Farnham Road, 
Odiham
Hampshire
RG29 1AB, UK

 

Spectro
Tel:  +44 (0) 1256 704000 (24 hours)
AOG:  +44 (0) 1256 393500 (24 hours)
Fax:  +44 (0) 1256 704006
Email:  enquiries@spectro-oil.com

Jet-Care GPA
Tel: +44 (0) 1256 701777 (24 hours)
Fax: +44 (0) 1256 701377
Email:  inquiries@jet-care.com
Opening Hours

Mon-Fri: 7am - 6pm
Sat: 9am - 1pm 
Sun: 9am - 1pm on request

AOG

Available 24/7
for AOG situations

Contact Info UK

JET-CARE USA

Local time: 2:41PM
USA

 

Welcome to Jet-Care International, Inc

Our state-of-the-art facility in Cedar Knolls, New Jersey serves a wide portfolio of customers with both laboratory and engine trend monitoring services. In 2009 we completed a multi-million dollar refurbishment with an expanded laboratory and a separate Research & Development facility. Further improvements included backup power generators and ground floor extension to provide for the recycling of solvents used during testing.
 


Jet-Care is proud to offer a first class responsive service to our customers:

  •   Highly experienced team of technicians and analysts
  •   Engine trending through the Jet-Care Gas Path Analysis Program
  •   State-of-the-art UKAS accredited laboratory facilities
  •   Comprehensive reporting of analysis results

Jet-Care International, Inc. team:

David Glass   CEO
Alison Potere   Continuous Improvement Manager 
Pam Kaur   Laboratory Manager 
Alan Baker   International Sales and Marketing Manager
Chris Brown   IT Manager
Rona Levin   Manager of Accounts and HR
Alison Hayden   Communications Officer
     
     

Jet-Care International, Inc
3 Saddle Road
Cedar Knolls
NJ 07927, USA

 

Tel: +1 973 292 9597
Fax: +1 973 292 3030
AOG: +1 973 960 4863
 

+1 973 292 9597
(during normal business hours)

Email:  inquiries@jet-care.com

Opening Hours

Mon-Fri: 7am - 6pm
Sat: 9am - 1pm 

AOG

Available 24/7
for AOG situations

Contact Info USA

SPECTRO SWITZERLAND

Local time: 2:41PM
Swiss

Welcome to Spectro Oil AG

Our Swiss laboratory is located in Kaiseraugst, near Basel, and provides a comprehensive laboratory analysis service to our European customers. 
 


Spectro is proud to offer a first class, responsive service to our customers:

  •   Highly experienced team of technicians and analysts
  •   SAS accredited laboratory facilities
  •   Comprehensive reporting of analysis results

Spectro Switzerland team:

David Glass   Managing Director
Andy Mathys   Laboratory Manager
Alan Baker   International Sales & Marketing Manager
Alison Potere   Continuous Improvement Manager
Alison Hayden   Communications Officer
Chris Brown   IT Manager
     

Spectro Oil AG
Rinaustrasse 452
CH-4303 Kaiseraugst
Switzerland
 

Tel: +41 (0) 61 815 90 20
Fax: +41 (0) 61 815 90 21
Email:  enquiries@spectro-oil.com

Opening Hours

Mon-Fri: 8am - 6pm
Sat & Sun: 9am - 1pm 

AOG

Available 24/7
for AOG situations

Contact Info Switzerland